About "seem"

1. “Seem” – it is a linking verb that is used with adjectives and not with adverbs.
Examples:
You seem happy with work today!
Anna and Jane seem excited for the party with friends tonight!

2. Seem and seem to be
“Seem” is often followed by ¬¬“to be”. “Seem to be” is used when we talk about objective facts: the things that seem to be definitely true.
Example:
Ms. Ueda is 50, but she doesn’t seem to be looking old.
“Seem” is used “without to be” when we are talking about subjective impressions.
Example:
She seems (to be) uneasy and inattentive today.

3. With nouns
“Seem to be” is common before “noun phrases”.
Example:
I applied in the company and I spoke to the man who seemed to be the manager.
However, “to be” can be dropped before noun phrases which express more subjective feelings.
Example:
He seems (to be) very kind.

4. Other infinitives
Seem can be followed by the infinitives of other besides “be”.
Example:
Jane seems to need a lot of attention and care.
Perfect infinitives.
Example:
People seem to have made a mistake about judging the artist.
In expressing a negative idea we use a negative form of seem: but in a more formal style
“not” is used.
Example:
Hannah doesn’t seem to get what I mean.
Hannah seems not to get what I mean.

5. Seem like
We can use “like” but not as, after seem.
Example:
The countryside seems (like) a good and nice place for a vacation.

6. It can be a preparatory subject for that- and as if clauses after seem.
Examples:
It seems that it’s going to rain later.
It seemed as if the party is never going to end.

7. There seems can be a preparatory subject for seem to be.
Example:
There seems to be lacking in the grocery items that I bought.
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